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Project:

Islands of Work at the Rough Edge of the World; and: Archiving Culture and Nature: Harlan I. Smith’s Ethnographic Record of the Pacific Slope

Two book-length studies will be completed. The first is a capstone historical-geographical-intellectual study of the workings and impact of the Pacific Coast salmon-canning industry of the late 19th century through to the present: Islands of Work at the Rough Edge of the World. The second book is Archiving Culture and Nature: Harlan I. Smith’s Ethnographic Record of the Pacific Slope, 1897-1937. This interdisciplinary archival and community-based research project delves into the records of Canadian archaeologist and ethnographer Harlan I. Smith for a co-edited, heavily annotated and introduced book-length manuscript of Smith’s letters to and from the Pacific Slope from his time with the famous Jessup North Pacific Expedition, 1897-1910, through to the end of his period as head archaeologist of the Geological Survey of Canada (1911 – 1937), and a selection of his critical essays and ethnographic photographs pertaining to the same region and time, for a scholarly press. The study will contribute to a critical history of both anthropology in Canada and the United States and the interactions between anthropology and Aboriginal communities in a politically critical point in time for Aboriginal peoples in North America.

 

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Is any information on this page incorrect or outdated? Please notify Ms. Nel-Mari Loock at [email protected].